Washing Machine of Destiny Production Photo. Two performers wearing white lab-coats grip distinctly homemade equipment (I.e. a colander wired into the machinery) and gesture at something off-camera.
Washing Machine of Destiny Production Photo. Two performers wearing white lab-coats grip distinctly homemade equipment (I.e. a colander wired into the machinery) and gesture at something off-camera.
Washing Machine of Destiny Production Photo. A performer with curly brown hair and circular glasses points dramatically off camera, his sky-blue blazer swishing and his mouth and eyes wide.
Washing Machine of Destiny Production Photo. Two male-presenting performers – one young and clean-shaven, the other grey-haired and bearded – stand side-by-side with their arms around one another’s backs. Their other hands are both held in a questioning gesture, matching their expressions.

The Washing Machine of Destiny

  • Show Information
  • Reviews

Last chance to come for a spin – our final shows, ever!

“Sometimes my mind feels like a washing machine on different cycles, with tumbling thoughts…sometimes my head is spinning!”

What happens when two fellas on the autistic spectrum decide to pool their passions – music, technology, washing machines, mystery adventures, superheroes and magic – and make a play?  The Washing Machine of Destiny is what.

“The play breaks myths about autism and gives rise to laughs at the same time with its honesty and rawness. The actors bare themselves with courage and grace. A triumph that uplifts the soul.”

The Washing Machine of Destiny has toured round the South West for the past year, attracting audiences from 8 to 98, neurodivergent and neurotypical. The show is full of bonkers humour as well as insight and intrigue, taking us on a journey with Launderette owner Vinny and his mate, Conrad the magician, to defeat the Evil Controller. On the way we meet all sorts of characters from mad scientists to an angry French Mayor. We also spend time in the company of Philip and Luca just being themselves, responding to audience questions and navigating the demands of creating a new kind of theatre and saving the world all at the same time.

“This show is a celebration of belonging.” Audience Review

The Washing Machine of Destiny has come from the imaginations and hard graft of Luca Saunders and Philip Robinson, both living with autism, via neurotypical Pippa Marriott (director & script wrangler).


Supported by Arts Council England, Recovery Devon, Villages in Action & Crediton Arts Centre.


Accessibility

Every performance of The Washing Machine of Destiny will be relaxed.

“The best theatre show I’ve seen in a very long time – ground-breaking, joyous and full of insight.  Go and see it!”

Audience Review

“It’s a wonderful show, a delight to watch and an amazing way to invite neuro-typical people in the audience into the head space of two people with autism.”

Audience Review

“I came away feeling as though I had been through a cerebral and emotional full colour-spectrum wash cycle. Vital, ground-breaking and inspirational.”

Audience Review

“Quite unlike anything you are likely to see this year.”

Audience Review

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